Past Events

For a Borderless World of Geoscience
When: 
Sat, 05/20/2017 to Thu, 05/25/2017
Where: 
Chiba, Japan

Organizers announce a call for abstracts for the 2017 Japan Geosciences Union (JpGU) and the American Geophysical Union (AGU) Joint Meeting with the theme, "For a Borderless World of Geoscience."

When: 
Thu, 05/25/2017
Where: 
Virtual Meeting

This IARPC Arctic Data Collaboration Team Meeting will include a presentation by SEARCH's Permafrost Action Team lead Christina Schädel on the Permafrost Carbon Network and a discussion of Arctic Carbon Budget synthesis efforts.

When: 
Mon, 05/22/2017 to Thu, 05/25/2017
Where: 
University of Iceland, Reykjavik

An international conference on high latitude dust will take place at the University of Iceland from Monday 22nd to Thursday 25th May 2017. This will be the first such conference and focuses on all aspects of dust which is sourced from within the high latitudes (North of 50 deg. N and south of 40 deg. S). The meeting will include optional field excursions in southern Iceland.

Scientific themes will include:

When: 
Wed, 05/24/2017
Where: 
Washington, D.C. and online

The public is invited to attend the first meeting of a new study to develop a research and development agenda for carbon dioxide removal (CDR) and carbon sequestration approaches on Wednesday, May 24, 2017 in Washington D.C. (or via WebEx). The committee of experts who will conduct the study are tasked with identifying the research needed to assess the benefits, risks, and sustainable scale potential for various approaches and increase their commercial viability.

Presenter: April M. Melvin, Associate Program Officer, The National Academy of Sciences
When: 
Wed, 05/24/2017
Where: 
Online: 12:00-1:00pm EDT

Abstract: Climate change in Alaska is causing widespread environmental change that is damaging critical infrastructure. As climate change continues, infrastructure is expected to become more vulnerable to damage, increasing risks to residents and resulting in large economic impacts. In this study, we quantified potential economic damages to Alaska public infrastructure resulting from climate driven changes in flooding, precipitation, near-surface permafrost thaw, and freeze–thaw cycles under relatively high and low climate scenarios.

When: 
Wed, 05/24/2017
Where: 
Washington, D.C. and online

The public is invited to attend the first meeting of a new study to develop a research and development agenda for carbon dioxide removal (CDR) and carbon sequestration approaches on Wednesday, May 24, 2017 in Washington D.C. (or via WebEx). The committee of experts who will conduct the study are tasked with identifying the research needed to assess the benefits, risks, and sustainable scale potential for various approaches and increase their commercial viability.

Presenter: April M. Melvin, Associate Program Officer, The National Academy of Sciences
When: 
Wed, 05/24/2017
Where: 
Online: 12:00-1:00pm EDT

Abstract: Climate change in Alaska is causing widespread environmental change that is damaging critical infrastructure. As climate change continues, infrastructure is expected to become more vulnerable to damage, increasing risks to residents and resulting in large economic impacts. In this study, we quantified potential economic damages to Alaska public infrastructure resulting from climate driven changes in flooding, precipitation, near-surface permafrost thaw, and freeze–thaw cycles under relatively high and low climate scenarios.

When: 
Wed, 05/24/2017
Where: 
Washington, D.C. and online

The public is invited to attend the first meeting of a new study to develop a research and development agenda for carbon dioxide removal (CDR) and carbon sequestration approaches on Wednesday, May 24, 2017 in Washington D.C. (or via WebEx). The committee of experts who will conduct the study are tasked with identifying the research needed to assess the benefits, risks, and sustainable scale potential for various approaches and increase their commercial viability.

Presenter: April M. Melvin, Associate Program Officer, The National Academy of Sciences
When: 
Wed, 05/24/2017
Where: 
Online: 12:00-1:00pm EDT

Abstract: Climate change in Alaska is causing widespread environmental change that is damaging critical infrastructure. As climate change continues, infrastructure is expected to become more vulnerable to damage, increasing risks to residents and resulting in large economic impacts. In this study, we quantified potential economic damages to Alaska public infrastructure resulting from climate driven changes in flooding, precipitation, near-surface permafrost thaw, and freeze–thaw cycles under relatively high and low climate scenarios.

When: 
Wed, 05/24/2017
Where: 
Washington, D.C. and online

The public is invited to attend the first meeting of a new study to develop a research and development agenda for carbon dioxide removal (CDR) and carbon sequestration approaches on Wednesday, May 24, 2017 in Washington D.C. (or via WebEx). The committee of experts who will conduct the study are tasked with identifying the research needed to assess the benefits, risks, and sustainable scale potential for various approaches and increase their commercial viability.