Three Calls for AGU Fall Meeting Session Abstracts: High-Latitude Earth Systems; Arctic Ocean–Earth Energy Imbalance; Vulnerability of Permafrost Carbon

Date: 
26 July 2019

Three Calls for AGU Fall Meeting Session Abstracts
American Geophysical Union Fall Meeting
9-13 December 2019
San Francisco, California

Abstract submission deadline: Wednesday, 31 July 2019

For more information about the 2019 AGU Fall Meeting, go to:
https://www2.agu.org/fall-meeting


The American Geophysical Union (AGU) is currently accepting abstract submissions for the 2019 Fall Meeting. The meeting will be held 9-13 December 2019 in San Francisco, California.

Conveners of the following three sessions invite abstract submissions:

SESSION GC040: High-Latitude Earth Systems – From Process-Level Understanding to Advanced Regional Predictive Capabilities
Conveners: Wieslaw Maslowski, Renu Joseph, Hailong Wang, and Wilbert Weijer

The dynamics of polar regions is of high societal relevance due to their response to, and impact on, global climate change, including sea level rise, atmosphere/ocean heat transport, carbon storage, extreme events, etc. To address such issues, advancements are required in process-level understanding and coupling within the high-latitude Earth systems, integrating observational and modeling efforts from regional to global scales.
This session focuses on progress and challenges in observing and modeling the high-latitude environment, including syntheses of field measurements and modeling, and Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 6 (CMIP6) results. Conveners solicit presentations that advance understanding of (i) the operation of individual components of the polar Earth systems and their coupling, (ii) internal and external drivers of polar climate change, and (iii) their linkages to lower latitudes and to extreme events. Contributions on (iv) reducing model biases and (v) uncertainty in prediction of future high-latitude change are also strongly encouraged.

For more information and to submit an abstract to this session, go to:
https://agu.confex.com/agu/fm19/prelim.cgi/Session/82278

For questions about this session, contact:
Wieslaw Maslowski
Email: maslowsk [at] nps.edu
Phone: 831-656-3162

SESSION OS021: Linkages Between the Arctic Ocean and the Earth Energy Imbalance
Conveners: Wieslaw Maslowski, Robert Osinski, and Younjoo Lee

Oceanic heat content (OHC) is the primary contributor to the Earth Energy Imbalance, which is a fundamental metrics of climate change. Some of the largest uncertainty in OHC estimates are associated with polar and shelf regions. The Arctic Ocean consists of a large fraction of shallow marginal seas, which control its exchanges with the lower latitude oceans. Also, the surface energy and freshwater budgets have been modulated by a declining sea ice cover and Arctic amplification. Thus, the combined changes in Arctic-wide energy imbalance are likely of relative importance to the global energy imbalance and climate change.

This session focuses on progress and challenges in observing and modeling the Arctic Ocean, including its role within the fully coupled Earth system. Conveners solicit presentations that advance understanding of Arctic energy imbalance, changing hydrography and dynamics, and Arctic-subarctic mass and property fluxes in a hierarchy of ocean and coupled Earths system models.

For more information and to submit an abstract to this session, go to:
https://agu.confex.com/agu/fm19/prelim.cgi/Session/83106

For questions about this session, contact:
Wieslaw Maslowski
Email: maslowsk [at] nps.edu
Phone: 831-656-3162

SESSION B128: Vulnerability of Permafrost Carbon to Climate Change
Conveners: Christina Schaedel and Elaine Pegoraro

Permafrost carbon (C) remains one of the most important C cycle feedbacks to climate, with implications for global society. Permafrost region soils contain 1440-1600 billion tons of C; release of just a fraction of this pool as carbon dioxide and methane can accelerate climate change. Permafrost degradation can change ecosystem C storage by enhancing microbial activity and ecosystem respiration, but can also stimulate plant growth and increase C stored in vegetation and surface soil. This session invites papers that examine factors causing losses and gains in permafrost C that contribute to current observations and future projections of changing permafrost C through time. Papers may address any aspect of this topic from microbial communities to the global scale, using a range of field or laboratory measurements or modeling to detect and forecast permafrost thaw and the influence on the C cycle and future climate.

For more information and to submit an abstract to this session, go to:
https://agu.confex.com/agu/fm19/prelim.cgi/Session/81978

For questions about this session, contact:
Christina Schaedel
Email: christina.schaedel [at] nau.edu
Phone: 405-371-3350