Santonu Goswami

Department

Climate Change Science Institute

Organization

Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Email
goswamis [at] ornl.gov
Phone
915-861-1143

Address

Indian Space Research Organisation
Hyderabad
India

Brief Biography

Santonu Goswami is a postdoctoral research associate within the environmental sciences division in Oak Ridge National Laboratory. His main research interest focuses on understanding permafrost degradation in the higher latitudes affects ecosystem structure and functions.

Santonu's fascination for terrestrial biology grew out of his love for nature. Once he began his research work in the arctic, his interest expanded and he yearned to explore the other polar region. Santonu was fortunate enough to take part in an Antarctic expedition (IPY-ROAM) during Dec 2007-Dec 2008. He hopes to continue his research trying to understand how various ecosystems are affected by the recent changing climate and that one day he will be able to do some research in the "third pole", the Himalayan region.

Santonu is interested in addressing all types of audiences and is available at all times of the year. Representative lectures include:

Monitoring Ecosystem Dynamics Using Hyperspectral Reflectance and a Robotic Tram System in an Arctic Landscape

Experiences from an Antarctic Expedition as part of an International Polar Year project (IPY-ROAM)

Why we do what we do sharing experiences from the field

"I believe it is important to share our research experiences with audiences who may not have access to the type of research we do, mainly to expose them to the exciting world of ecosystem research and also create awareness about the changes that the earth system is going through at present. As a researcher it is our duty to communicate with the public to educate them about what we do and create awareness about the changing environment."

Science Specialties

climate change, remote sensing, tundra ecology

Current Research

Remote sensing and surface hydrology, remote sensing and vegetation dynamics, pan-arctic scale permafrost carbon feedback to global change.