Anne Jensen




Bryn Mawr & UAF

amjuics [at]


PO Box 750
Barrow, AK 99723
United States

Brief Biography

Anne Jensen is a long-time resident of Barrow, Alaska, the northernmost community in the United States. She has 27 years experience in anthropology in Alaska, including ethnographic research, archaeological surveys and excavation sites throughout Alaska. She serves as Principal Investigator at Pingusugruk, Ukkuqsi, Ipiutaq and Nuvuk on the North Slope.

Jensen is currently General Manager and Senior Scientist for Ukpeavik Iupiat Corporation (UIC) Science LLC, facilitating support and operation contracts for U.S. Department of Energy climate change research in Barrow and Atqasuk, a U.S. Department of Education "Education through Cultural and Historical Organizations" (ECHO) grant project. Jensen has published on resource use and zooarchaeology. Her current research focuses on human adaptation in arctic and subarctic environments; paleoeconomy and paleoenvironments; and traditional knowledge of Iupiat peoples. She is the principal investigator on, "Learning From the Past: Archaeology of Nuvuk," which is working with local students to excavate a rapidly eroding major Thule cemetery at Point Barrow (c. AD 1000-1500), Alaska, a project which has recently discovered the northernmost Ipiutak (c. AD 300-400) occupation in the world. Jensen has a great deal of experience speaking to all kinds of audiences.

A few representative lectures include:

Exciting Finds from Nuvuk: Archaeology at the Top of the World

Traditional Wooden Houses of North Alaska

What is Archaeology, and How Do We Do It?

Maintaining Ethical Relationships Between Researchers and Native Communities

"People are fascinated by the Arctic and by archaeology of the Arctic. When people find out what I do, they ask a lot of questions, and talking with groups helps spread the knowledge. It is worth noting that public education also is the best way to diminish looting, increase respect, and protect cultural resources for everyone."

Science Specialties

archaeology, human/environment interaction, traditional knowledge and wisdom

Current Research

Climate-faunal-human interaction in North Alaska. Archaeology of the North Slope, especially the Point Barrow-Point Franklin region. Nuvuk site and cemetery (cal AD 875-1400). Thule origins and development.   Traditional knowledge of the North Slope. Inupiaq epistemology.