SIPN Webinars

All webinar times are listed in Alaska time zone.

The 2016 Sea Ice Outlook (SIO) - Post Season Discussion

Dates: 
Tuesday, 11 October 2016 - 8:00am to 9:00am

This webinar included a discussion of the 2016 Sea Ice Outlook (SIO) with a focus on the lessons learned from this season, what was new this season, and what areas could be improved for the future. Presentations included a review and analysis of the outlooks contributed from 2008 to 2016, discussion of the 2016 summer sea-ice conditions that lead to the minima this year, and discussion of the SIO success and challenges at the local scale. Time for community discussion followed the presentations.

Real-time community discussion was supported on twitter with hashtag: #SIPN

Presentations by SIPN Leadership Team Members:

Larry Hamilton
University of New Hampshire

Edward Blanchard-Wrigglesworth
University of Washington

Bios:
Lawrence (Larry) Hamilton is a Carsey Senior Faculty Fellow and professor of sociology at the University of New Hampshire. Integration across social and natural science has been a common theme in Larry's research on environment and social change. Since 1992, he has conducted interdisciplinary studies around the circumpolar North, supported by a series of grants from the National Science Foundation.

On New Hampshire's statewide Granite State Poll, which interviews random samples of 500 people four times each year, Larry has been tracking public perceptions of science, the environment and climate. Combining his Arctic and survey interests, some recent studies explore what the general public knows and believes about polar regions. More details about his research can be found on his personal home page.

Edward Blanchard Wrigglesworth is a Research Associate in Atmospheric Sciences at the University of Washington. His research interest include atmosphere-sea ice-ocean interactions, Arctic Sea ice predictability, and snow on sea-ice in the Arctic.

Edward has recently presented talks including "Lessons from a multi-model SIO experiment" to the 2016 Polar Predictability Workshop, "Arctic sea ice forecasting: an update from the trenches' to the CESM Polar Climate Working Group 2016 annual meeting. More information is available on his website.

Archive Video: 

23 August 2016: Sea Ice Prediction Network Webinar

Dates: 
Tuesday, 23 August 2016 - 10:00am to 11:00am

Uncertainty in Satellite-Derived Sea Ice Extent Estimates

This webinar focused on uncertainty in sea ice extent estimates from remotely-sensed data. Arctic sea ice extent estimates from remote sensing data (e.g., passive microwave sensors like Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer-Earth Observing System [AMSR-E] and others) are widely used to project sea ice trends, initialize models, and evaluate model forecasts. As with all kinds of remote observations, this method of estimating sea ice extent has strengths and weaknesses that result in unique kinds of uncertainty. To date, however, little effort has been made to provide an uncertainty range of extent estimates from satellite data. Meier discussed our current understanding of these issues and proposed various methods of estimating extent uncertainty, with the aim of improving analyses of sea ice extent trends and variability. A question and answer session with participants followed the presentation.

Webinar Presenter:

Walt Meier
NASA Goddard Space Flight Center

Bio:

Walt Meier, a member of the SIPN leadership team, is a research scientist at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center Cryospheric Sciences Laboratory. His research focuses on remote sensing of sea ice, development of new sea ice products and sea ice climate data records, and analyzing changes in the Arctic sea ice cover. He has been the principal investigator on a project to create a sea ice climate data record.

Archive Video: 

22 March 2016 Sea Ice Prediction Network Webinar

Sea Ice Prediction Network Webinar
Dates: 
Tuesday, 22 March 2016 - 9:00am to 10:00am

Challenges and Best Practices: Sea Ice Thickness Distribution as a Rosetta Stone for Cross-Scale Communication

This webinar addressed issues related to estimating sea ice thickness across many scales and included discussion on the consistency of sea ice thickness distributions across different horizontal length scales, specifically the issue of measurement accuracy and some of the challenges related to estimating sea ice thickness across many length scales. The presentation offered insight into the general phenomenon of "up-scaling" by considering scaling relationships as a form of communication, specifically the communication of information between scales; and illustrated some new best practices illustrated a simple heuristic model and some small case studies.

Webinar Presenter

Cathleen Geiger
University of Delaware

Archive Video: 

6 October 2015 Sea Ice Prediction Network Webinar

Sea Ice Prediction Network Webinar
Dates: 
Tuesday, 6 October 2015 - 10:00am to 11:00am

The 2015 Sea Ice Outlook (SIO) - Post Season Discussion

This webinar included a discussion of the 2015 Sea Ice Outlook (SIO) with a focus on what were the lessons learned from this season, what was new this season, and what areas could be improved for the future. Presentations included a review and analysis of the outlooks contributed from 2008 to 2015, discussion of the 2015 summer sea-ice conditions that lead to the minima this year, and discussion of the SIO success and challenges at the local scale. Community discussion followed the presentations

Webinar Presenters

Larry Hamilton
University of New Hampshire

Julienne Stroeve
National Snow and Ice Data Center
Cecilia Bitz
University of Washington

11 August 2015 Sea Ice Prediction Network Webinar

Sea Ice Prediction Network Webinar
Dates: 
Tuesday, 11 August 2015

Industry Needs for Seasonal and Sub-seasonal Sea Ice Information and Predictions

This webinar provided a brief overview of contrasts and commonalities between sea ice variables relevant for geophysical or climate research and those relevant for operational needs in Arctic seas. The presentation focused on two key events in the seasonal ice cycle, freeze-up and break-up, and provided examples from Alaska and Canadian waters. Specific information needs of the maritime industry were discussed including a brief review of how specific sea ice information such as freeze-up enters into the regulatory and operations process. A review of how industry needs are currently addressed, including a discussion of key gaps, identified specific questions relevant in the context of sea ice predictions.

Webinar Presenters

Hajo Eicken
International Arctic Research Center
University of Alaska Fairbanks

Adrienne Tivy
National Research Council of Canada

Archive Video: 

5 May 2015 Sea Ice Prediction Network Webinar

Sea Ice Prediction Network Webinar
Dates: 
Tuesday, 5 May 2015

Observations of Arctic Snow and Sea Ice Thickness from Satellite and Airborne Surveys

This webinar, organized by the Sea Ice Prediction Network Leadership Team, provided information on the current state and availability of snow and sea ice thickness data from NASA's Operation IceBridge airborne surveys and the European Space Agency's CryoSat-2 satellite mission. The accuracy and limitations of these operational data sets was also discussed to place the utility of the data in context for use in a variety of study areas.

Webinar Presenter
Nathan Kurtz
NASA Goddard Space Flight Center

Archive Video: 

3 March 2015 Sea Ice Prediction Network Webinar

Sea Ice Prediction Network Webinar
Dates: 
Tuesday, 3 March 2015

Sea Ice Modeling: Characteristics and Processes Critical for the Radiation Budget

This webinar was organized by the Sea Ice Prediction Network Leadership Team. It provided an overview that included topics in sea ice modeling from the global climate modeling perspective and recent development within the Los Alamos Sea Ice Model CICE (aslo known as the Community Ice CodE) to more accurately represent sea ice characteristics and processes critical for the radiation budget of the ice pack.

Formed from frozen seawater rich in biological and chemical species, sea ice exists as a thin layer at the interface of the ocean and atmosphere, quite sensitive to small changes in temperature and radiative forcing. The high albedo of the ice pack is critical for the Earth's heat balance, and ice motion across the ocean's surface transports fresh water and salt. The basic components in a complete sea ice model must include both vertical thermodynamics and horizontal dynamics.

Webinar Presenters:
Elizabeth Hunke
Los Alamos National Laboratory

Archive Video: 

9 October 2014 Sea Ice Outlook: Post-Season Discussion

Sea Ice Outlook: Post-Season Discussion
Dates: 
Thursday, 9 October 2014

This open webinar, hosted by the Sea Ice Prediction Network (SIPN), focused on post-season analysis and discussion of the 2014 Sea Ice Outlook (SIO). The SIO produces reports in June, July, and August that synthesize a variety of predictions and perspectives on the arctic sea ice minimum. The webinar provided a venue for discussion of the 2014 SIO, including processes that influenced sea ice melt this year and a review of the differing approaches to predicting the sea ice minimum extent.

Webinar Presenters:
Cecilia Bitz
University of Washington

Julienne Stroeve
National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC)

Walt Meier
NASA - Goddard

Edward Blanchard-Wrigglesworth
University of Washingtion

François Massonnet
Université Catholique de Louvain, Brussels

Jonny Day
University of Reading, United Kingdom

Virginie Guemas
Institut Catala de Ciencies del Clima, Barcelona, Spain

David Schröder
University of Reading, United Kingdom

Questions for Participants

In preparation for the webinar, participants we encouraged to think about the following questions:

  • How would you characterize the success of Sea Ice Outlook predictions this year, including relative strengths or weaknesses of different methodologies?
    [Note: On 7 October 2014 NSIDC announced the Arctic sea ice extent averaged for the month of September 2014 was 5.28 million square kilometers (2.04 million square miles), also the 6th lowest in the satellite record. More information is available here.]
  • What do you see as the main factors driving this year’s minimum extent?
  • If you were a SIO contributor, are there specific datasets or other information that would have been useful to have for your predictions?
  • What would you like to see changed (or kept the same) about the SIO?
  • What kind of post-season analyses or activities would you like to see?
  • Where do we go from here as a sea ice prediction community?
Archive Video: 

20 February 2014 Sea Ice Prediction Network Webinar

Sea Ice Prediction Network Webinar
Dates: 
Thursday, 20 February 2014

This Sea Ice Prediction Network (SIPN) webinar was hosted by the Arctic Research Consortium of the U.S. (ARCUS). This webinar provided a brief summary of SIPN project goals and began discussions on how to improve sea ice predictions, specifically for the 2014 Sea Ice Outlook.

Guest Speakers include Dr. Julienne Stroeve of the National Snow & Ice Data Center in Boulder, Colorado, Dr. Cecilia Bitz of the Polar Science Center and Department of Atmospheric Sciences at the University of Washington, and post-doc Dr. Edward Blanchard-Wrigglesworth in the Department of Atmospheric Sciences at the University of Washington.

Archive Video: