The Earth is Faster Now

The Earth is Faster NowThe Earth is Faster Now

You may download a low-resolution PDF of the front matter, including table of contents and list of contributors.

Cover and Table of Contents (PDF - 1.7 MB)

ARCUS has published a collection of ten papers describing contemporary efforts to document indigenous knowledge of environmental change in the Arctic. Compiled and edited by Igor Krupnik and Dyanna Jolly, "The Earth is Faster Now: Indigenous Observations of Arctic Environmental Change" is available from ARCUS for $25 U.S.This publication was supported by the NSF Arctic Social Sciences Program with additional support for increased distribution provided by the Arctic Studies Center, Smithsonian Institution.

The Earth is Faster Now reviews major individual studies on indigenous knowledge and climate change undertaken during the past few years, primarily in North America. The text is accompanied by local observations, quotations from interviews, personal observations, illustrations, and photographs. Contributors include well- known academic researchers and Native people from Canada, Finland, and the United States. The publication is designed to be useful to both researchers and communities as a tool for networking and communication.

Click here to learn more about the Igor Krupnik and Dyanna Jolly, editors of The Earth is Faster Now.

Copies of The Earth is Faster Now are available for $25.00 USD per copy (includes all shipping and handling charges). Discounts are available for orders of 10 or more copies. The discounted price is $15.00 per copy. The discount price of $15.00 per copy also applies to all reseller orders, regardless of quantity.

To inquire about discounts, bulk purchases, or to place an order e-mail order [at] arcus [dot] org, phone 907-474-1600, or fax 907-474-1604.

Back to publications


Igor Krupnik and Dyanna JollyIgor Krupnik and Dyanna Jolly

Igor Krupnik (Arctic Studies Center, Smithsonian Institution) is currently working on a project in collaboration with St. Lawrence Island Yupíik. Dyanna Jolly was affiliated with the University of Manitoba and the Inuit Observations on Climate Change project in Sachs Harbour, Canada in 1999ñ2000 and is now working on co-management issues in New Zealand at the Center for Maori and Indigenous Planning and Development at Lincoln University, New Zealand.

The editors and ARCUS thank the NSF Arctic Social Sciences Program for supporting this volume, the Arctic Studies Center, Smithsonian Institution for additional funding, and the authors for their hard work, patience, and dedication to working together. We want to express very special acknowledgements and appreciation to the people who shared the important knowledge that is documented in this volume.

This publication may be cited as:

Krupnik, Igor, and Jolly, Dyanna (eds.). 2002. The Earth is Faster Now: Indigenous Observations of Arctic Environmental Change. Fairbanks, Alaska: Arctic Research Consortium of the United States. 384 pp. ISBN 0-9720449-0-6.